Federal Premium Gold Medal Large Rifle Match Primers #210M Box of 1000 (10 Trays of 100)

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Federal Rifle PrimersGold Medal Large Rifle Match Primers #210M Box of 1000 (10 Trays of 100)Quantity 1000 Piece Primer Size Large RifleI saw episode of Shooting USA once and they did a tour of Federal ammo factory. The only difference with the match grade primers is they had 3 of their most experienced workers doing those primers, same priming compound they just know how to make them better, more consistent when they apply mixture. I use match for precision rifle shooting, but whatever I can get for pistol. I saw episode of Shooting USA once and they did a tour of Federal ammo factory. The only difference with the match grade primers is they had 3 of their most experienced workers doing those primers, same priming compound they just know how to make them better, more consistent when they apply mixture. I use match for precision rifle shooting, but whatever I can get for pistol.Match-Grade Rifle Primers: Are They Better and Worth the Extra Expense? SEE PHOTO GALLERYPrimers labeled “match grade” cost 10 to 20 percent more than standard versions. Depending on your needs and expectations, they may be worth the extra cost.July 21, 2020By Joseph von BenediktWhile working my way through college at a local gun shop, I advised a customer frustrated with his inaccurate handloads to try match-grade primers. He bought a 100 pack of Federal Gold Medal caps, and the next week he came back brimming with enthusiasm: “Changing primers turned my rifle from a two-inch gun to a three-quarter-inch gun,” he said.I’ve always been the type to walk the extra mile for anything that might have an effect on performance, and I’ve always purchased match-grade primers. They’re only a few bucks more per 1,000, and the peace of mind I get by knowing I’m leaving no stone unturned in my search for precision makes the cost worth it.But do match-grade primers really make a difference? To find out, I recently performed a comparison test with two different rifles.The first was my old go-to Winchester Model 70 in .30-06. It was customized years ago by Hill Country Rifles and has a Lilja barrel. The second is my favorite PRS rifle, a GA Precision in 6mm Creedmoor with a Bartlein barrel.For the .30-06, I loaded five different test batches of ammunition, all using Nosler cases charged with 55 grains of Reloder 16 and topped with 175-grain Barnes LRX bullets. The only difference was the Large Rifle primers, of which there were five different types: Federal 210 standard, Federal 210 Gold Medal, CCI No. 200 standard, CCI BR-2 benchrest-grade and Winchester WLR standard.For the 6mm Creedmoor, I also loaded five batches. Each used new Peterson brass with Small Rifle primer pockets and charged with 40 grains of Reloder 16. I used Hornady 110-grain A-Tip bullets.Like the .30-06 test loads, I used both standard and Gold Medal grade Federal primers, and standard and benchrest grade CCI primers. For the fifth test batch, I used Remington No. 6½ Small Rifle standard primers.Photo Gallery See all PhotosMatch-Grade Rifle Primers: Are They Better and Worth the Extra Expense?Match-Grade-PrimersEach test batch consisted of 10 rounds, which I fired in two consecutive five-shot groups, clocking the full 10-round string using a LabRadar. Conditions at the range were questionable, with wind gusting to 12 mph and temperatures hovering at a finger-numbing 25 degrees. At least the barrels cooled quickly.Results were a little unanticipated, although one difference emerged almost immediately. I started with the .30-06 because it needed to cool completely between five-shot groups. The Creedmoor’s heavy match barrel doesn’t and historically has grouped a bit tighter during the second five-shot group in a 10-round string.